Allergic reaction to royal jelly

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Royal Jelly produce

The main component of royal jelly (the two main proteins) can produce allergic reactions, but it is also caused by pollen grains in royal jelly harvested from certain allergic plants.

Under what circumstances should you worry about possible allergies to royal jelly?

  1. Pollen allergy can cause allergies to royal jelly.

A respiratory doctor at Alfred Hospital in Praslin, Australia, examined whether some patients had asthma and allergic reactions after taking royal jelly and whether royal jelly contained allergic (IgE-mediated) ingredients.

Studies have shown that these reactions are indeed IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and that 18 different IgE-binding components are detected.

  1. Have a severe allergic reaction and may be allergic to royal jelly!

In one study, a 7-year-old child developed allergic symptoms after taking royal jelly but later proved that the child had no allergic reaction to royal jelly itself, but was allergic to certain almond particles in royal jelly. The reason is that almond pollen in royal jelly (which honeybees bring when collecting honey) is considered to be a possible cause of allergies in patients.

  1. Suffering from asthma may be allergic to royal jelly!

If you have asthma, it is best to check if you are allergic to royal jelly.

Studies have shown that Japanese women with bronchial asthma, allergic conjunctivitis, allergic rhinitis and food allergies develop an allergic reaction after drinking a drink containing royal jelly. After the allergen test, royal jelly is considered to be an ingredient that triggers an allergic reaction.

Other studies investigated 7 patients with a history of mild to moderate asthma who had a significant history of royal jelly intake.

According to Rosmilah M and other research centers at the Allergy and Immunology Research Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, the main allergens of royal jelly are the main royal jelly protein 1 (MRJ1) and the major royal jelly protein 2 (MRJ2).

In conclusion:

People with high allergic reactions, people with a history of asthma or people with a history of pollen allergy – you may be allergic to royal jelly.

You can start with a small amount of royal jelly and slowly increase to the required dose. Reduce allergic reactions.

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